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Meet Carolyn | Systems Thinking Schools

META: SYSTEMS FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING

One thing I noticed during my student teaching, and as an associate teacher, was that my mentors and master teachers, had a lot of experience and a lot of systems in place. That seemed to be what kids needed to be successful. I remember thinking I needed to have systems in order to function, so everybody gets what they need. Now I realize systems is not only a teaching lens, but informs the teaching practice.

We use systems to teach, and we also teach the kids to see and understand systems.

CONVERSATIONS, NOT ANSWERS

I knew some of my colleagues were using systems thinking, and I loved how it let the students lead. But it seemed a little risky; I wasn’t sure how I could guide the conversation where it needed to go. I think maybe I didn’t really understand it, and I wasn’t doing it “right”.  But as I used a systems approach, I really started to let go of that mindset and see that there’s really no right or wrong; it’s all learning.

ASSESSMENT

The maps show what students offered and how they added knowledge and made connections. Assessment using is enhanced because Systems maps are easy to review and share with students and even parents.

OUR STORIES: PUSHES AND PULLS

At the end of the school year we talk about our communities, our city, and how we all got here. The conversation about immigration starts from students’ personal and family histories, and brings us right up to today. What are ways to welcome kids who might be new here in Los Angeles? How do they learn the systems of living here?

So my students brainstormed about making a website for kids who come here and might not know things to do. They also created pamphlets with topics on how to find homework help, free things to do in LA that are fun; places to learn English. These are all systems that they know about, and could even teach peers about.

CONVERSATIONS, NOT ANSWERS

I knew some of my colleagues were using systems thinking, and I loved how it let the students lead. But it seemed a little risky; I wasn’t sure how I could guide the conversation where it needed to go. I think maybe I didn’t really understand it, and I wasn’t doing it “right”.  But as I used a systems approach, I really started to let go of that mindset and see that there’s really no right or wrong; it’s all learning.

ASSESSMENT

The maps show what students offered and how they added knowledge and made connections. Assessment using is enhanced because Systems maps are easy to review and share with students and even parents.

META: SYSTEMS FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING

One thing I noticed during my student teaching, and as an associate teacher, was that my mentors and master teachers, had a lot of experience and a lot of systems in place.  That seemed to be what kids needed to be successful. I remember thinking I needed to have systems in order to function, so everybody gets what they need. Now I realize systems is not only a teaching lens, but informs the teaching practice.

We use systems to teach, and we also teach the kids to see and understand systems.

OUR STORIES: PUSHES AND PULLS

At the end of the school year we talk about our communities, our city, and how we all got here. The conversation about immigration starts from students’ personal and family histories, and brings us right up to today. What are ways to welcome kids who might be new here in Los Angeles? How do they learn the systems of living here?

So my students brainstormed about making a website for kids who come here and might not know things to do. They also created pamphlets with topics on how to find homework help, free things to do in LA that are fun; places to learn English. These are all systems that they know about, and could even teach peers about.

COMING SOON!

SYSTEMS THINKING SCHOOLS

Wildwood Outreach Center

11811 W OLYMPIC BLVD, LOS ANGELES, CA 90064

(310) 806-4502

sbarrett@wildwood.org

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