Warning: Declaration of PDA_WP_Upgrader_Skin::feedback($string) should be compatible with WP_Upgrader_Skin::feedback($string, ...$args) in /home/eliza506/public_html/wp-content/plugins/prevent-direct-access-gold/includes/class-prevent-direct-access-gold-wp-upgrader.php on line 5
Meet Brittany | Systems Thinking Schools

EAVESDROPPING IS INFORMATION

My deaf and hard of hearing students lack a lot of background knowledge, and they don’t pick up on a lot of contextual clues. That’s because people who don’t hear, don’t overhear.  So they often just don’t have the same level of prior knowledge as their peers.  But asking questions through a systems lens shows them that in fact they do have prior knowledge, there is a place to start, even if it is limited or selective prior knowledge.

SPECIAL NEEDS + SYSTEMS

The systems approach works in a Special Day classroom because it invites every style and level of experience. Because kids are leading the conversation, inclusivity is automatic. And as the teacher, it feels natural because this is how our brains tend to work; connections flow.  And for me, it also worked in teaching multiple grades, because peer to peer learning is invaluable with special day students.

IT’S ON THE MAP!

Systems is ideal for my kids because of the mapping. They can SEE what they know, and connections that can be made. It’s graphic, it’s documented, it’s validated. The maps help them understand that their knowledge is counted. They are not afraid to speak in class, or with other people.  Systems really builds confidence.

EXPRESSION IS EVERYTHING

From my first experience in a classroom with special needs students who are deaf or hard of hearing, I loved it. The magic of language learning, seeing that these children are so smart they and just didn’t have enough language to express themselves was incredible. I worked with a little girl who had just received two cochlear implants, so she was starting to listen at 3 years old. She had no receptive or expressive language, and then suddenly she was able to express some needs. Language unlocked her, and it was clear how her behavior shifted when she could express herself. Spoken language is invisible, but it is a system they learn about later and with more purpose than their peers.

SPECIAL NEEDS + SYSTEMS

The systems approach works in a Special Day classroom because it invites every style and level of experience. Because kids are leading the conversation, inclusivity is automatic. And as the teacher, it feels natural because this is how our brains tend to work; connections flow.  And for me, it also worked in teaching multiple grades, because peer to peer learning is invaluable with special day students.

IT’S ON THE MAP!

Systems is ideal for my kids because of the mapping. They can SEE what they know, and connections that can be made. It’s graphic, it’s documented, it’s validated. The maps help them understand that their knowledge is counted. They are not afraid to speak in class, or with other people.  Systems really builds confidence.

EAVESDROPPING IS INFORMATION

My deaf and hard of hearing students lack a lot of background knowledge, and they don’t pick up on a lot of contextual clues. That’s because people who don’t hear, don’t overhear.  So they often just don’t have the same level of prior knowledge as their peers.  But asking questions through a systems lens shows them that in fact they do have prior knowledge, there is a place to start, even if it is limited or selective prior knowledge.

EXPRESSION IS EVERYTHING

From my first experience in a classroom with special needs students who are deaf or hard of hearing, I loved it. The magic of language learning, seeing that these children are so smart they and just didn’t have enough language to express themselves was incredible. I worked with a little girl who had just received two cochlear implants, so she was starting to listen at 3 years old. She had no receptive or expressive language, and then suddenly she was able to express some needs. Language unlocked her, and it was clear how her behavior shifted when she could express herself. Spoken language is invisible, but it is a system they learn about later and with more purpose than their peers.

COMING SOON!

SYSTEMS THINKING SCHOOLS

Wildwood Outreach Center

11811 W OLYMPIC BLVD, LOS ANGELES, CA 90064

(310) 806-4502

sbarrett@wildwood.org

error: Content is protected !!